Sunday, Public Enemy revealed that they would be "moving forward" without Flavor Flav, firing the hype man after 37 years.

It is the conclusion that arrives of the saga that began when Flavor Flav sent a cease and desist letter to Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders in response to a Chuck D-led concert for the Sanders campaign in Los Angeles.

“Public Enemy and Public Enemy Radio will be moving forward without Flavor Flav,” the legendary group revealed in a statement to Pitchfork. “We thank him for his years of service and wish him well.” 

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This move was foreshadowed in a statement from Chuck D and his attorney on Saturday as they reminded everyone that Chuck D is the sole owner of the Public Enemy trademark, and has every right to exploit the Public ENemy name as he saw fit no matter who protests.

“From a legal standpoint, Chuck could perform as Public Enemy if he ever wanted to; he is the sole owner of the Public Enemy trademark. He originally drew the logo himself in the mid-’80s, is also the creative visionary and the group’s primary songwriter, having written Flavor’s most memorable lines.”

In his cease and desist letter ahead of Sunday's Sanders rally, Flavor Flav was vehemently against the use of Public Enemy as a vehicle of endorsement for Bernie Sanders, citing his personal lack of support for Sanders.

"Those who truly know what Public Enemy stands for know what time it is," read one portion of the letter. "There is no Public Enemy without Flavor Flav."