preloader

Who Is Wunna?

Words by: Alex Zidel
Photos by: Spike Jordan
& Maxime Quoilin

“I ain’t regular no more,” says Gunna matter-of-factly through a sneer. He’s slightly stunned that I asked when he finds time to merely be normal.

His response recalls that of his 2018 banger “Pedestrian.” “I can’t be a regular pedestrian,” raps Gunna on Drip Season 3. At that point in his career, it remained a high-minded goal of his to roam the streets and be recognized from all angles. It was more of a wish than a reality, but he confidently looked towards his future when he spit, “Can’t nobody stop me from my blessings.” Two short years later, he’s truly living his words, experiencing those blessings in real-time.

Today, he’s rocking an understated look, complete with a white deep V-neck t-shirt, and a pair of Off-White shorts. He’s fidgeting as our call begins, placing a series of bedazzled tennis chains around his neck, purposefully going one-by-one until he’s sufficiently pleased with his drip.

Sergio Kitchens has more or less retired his birth name. Unless he is with his immediate family -- his mother and brother specifically -- he goes by his self-appointed monikers, paired together by a childhood-reminiscent rhyme of “Gunna/Wunna.”

“They call me Serg,” Gunna says of his family. “My mom might call me Gunna just [from] time to time playing, laughing, but the majority of my family just calls me Serg.”

Gunna’s family has always supported his rap dreams, albeit, in a pragmatic way: “[My mom] never said don’t rap, she always said just have a backup plan.” This dose of realism was reflected in the way he was raised, too. Whereas some parents opt to shelter their children from worldly, or even local, issues, Gunna’s family valued transparency. “My family was just real about a lot of stuff, it wasn’t no lies being told. Well not even lies just like, facades. It wasn’t no picture painted, it was what it was, and my parents were just straightforward about a lot of things.” The lack of sugar-coating surely motivated the artist to not get bogged down by negativity, inspiring his roll-with-the-punches attitude.

Raised by a single mother, Gunna was the youngest of five boys. He learned as a youth that nothing would be handed to him, which instilled a mindset that he would need to brush away pain quickly, almost adopting an emotional numbness that would transform into his signature lackadaisical flow.

“If you outta sight, you outta mind/You gotta stack, you gotta grind,” raps Gunna on the opening track to the original Drip Season, “Outta Sight Outta Mind.” This sort of low-key motivational anthem has anchored his rise to the top, while reflecting his dismissive attitude towards anything negative.

These days, Gunna is a rockstar. He doesn’t get much sleep. Averaging anywhere between three-to-four hours of shut-eye per evening, the GRAMMY-nominated recording artist is often cranking out hits in the studio well past twilight, slipping into bed any time between 7 and 10 in the morning.

Gunna inevitably locks himself in the studio for a good portion of the day. He’s been recording tons of still-unreleased features these days, although the majority of the time, it sounds like he’s working with Young Thug and 21 Savage specifically. And even when he’s done at the studio, he’s not actually done-- “If I leave the studio and don’t go to the house, I’m probably going to another studio go fuck with [another rapper]-- yesterday I went and locked in with Nav for a few hours, but I left from here. I was up here with Thug and Savage, but I left and went over there to another studio just to catch another vibe, change the scenery and shit. I left there, came back here. Studio’s like a hangout spot to me,” Gunna reveals, laughing off his studio rat habits.

His drip -- getting dressed to the nines in designer garments and glowing jewelry -- is possibly his only other regularly-scheduled programming, even during quarantine. Gunna does not have much else in the way of a daily routine. “When I get up, I usually just go to the bathroom, wash my face, brush my teeth, and then I might go downstairs and smoke. I think that might be my normal morning. Face [wash], brush my teeth, get a blunt, and then start thinking about what I’m gonna do today.”

This go-with-the-flow attitude is emblematic of how Gunna operates as a human. He’s cool, collected, easygoing, and laid back.

“I just think I’m a calm person and I be nonchalant about a lot of shit. Not that I don’t care, but I just feel like the more energy you give something that’s negative, [the more] we stay on that topic,” he explains in a moment of profundity. “If you don’t give it that much energy, shit just gon’ go away. Time heals all. That’s how I be calm and relaxed, smoke that blunt, relax, sit back and I don’t try to think about it too much.” He pauses in a moment of concession, adding, “Everybody can’t do that.”

What if the blunt doesn’t work? “I did start working out too, when I was running out of things to do that felt like a stress reliever.”

Clearly, Gunna knows he can do more.

He’s very aware of the things he should be doing to maintain his sanity, a clear mind, and his booming career. Yoga, meditation, and other means of mindfulness are things that he has considered but, ultimately, he is reluctant to take the time to fully devote himself to the practice.

In other areas, though, like the ones that directly affect his career-- his musical output, his ability to perform-- he’s already begun the journey of self-betterment.

Placing another diamond-encrusted silver chain around his neck, Gunna compares his career trajectory to that of a Black-owned businessperson. Referring to himself as the product being marketed, he is cognizant of the fact that he must remain in tip-top shape to enjoy the pleasures of tomorrow.

"I just feel like the more energy you give something that’s negative, [the more] we stay on that topic."

Working out and eating healthy are recent additions to Gunna’s repertoire but he is already feeling the effects of his new habits, looking ahead to a possible joint headline tour with Lil Baby once coronavirus is in the past.

“I just wanted to feel different. I just wanted to feel like I worked more and did more than what I did last album,” admits Gunna of his healthy habits, slightly downplaying the significance of this statement with his passive tone. “It was about like my image, like, I’m looking at it and thinking shit finna open up, you know what I’m saying, so I wanna just be in shape for shows, fans, tours. I’m just thinking ahead.”

His self-improvement doesn’t stop with a fitness glo-up, though. Gunna has also been learning how to play the guitar, testing new vibes and constantly evolving as a creative. “It was just me, thinking for the future,” he says of his desire to learn the guitar, crossing his arms and shrugging.

As Gunna looks towards the future and his future-self, he pinpoints other areas that could be improved upon yet.

It appears Gunna’s soft-spoken nature has been quietly eating at him for the last couple of years. He watches other Geminis, naming Kanye West and Donald Trump specifically, getting their ideas out and proving what zodiac researchers have claimed for years. Geminis are expressive and, oftentimes, explosive. Gunna’s lyrical rhetoric is braggadocious but, in real life, he wants to rid himself of his mouselike placidity.

“It’s a lot of Geminis that’s really talented, like, we got the gift of gab. I feel like I can speak, but I just don’t do it a lot. I feel like, god damn one of these days and ages and times, I’m gonna just start being more outspoken about everything that I really think about, but I ain’t gon’ do it if I don’t feel comfortable. You know, like, god damn Kanye, he’s like a spokesperson. He’ll say some shit at the right time at the right moment. Pac was like that. Tupac. Even that n***a Trump, like, he always got something to say. Even if you not saying everything right, like, you know what I’m saying, but you got a voice.”

Elsewhere during our conversation, Gunna reflects on his philanthropic work and, again, assesses that he could be doing more. While speaking about a charity event that he organized in Atlanta, Gunna falls into another moment of vulnerability, critiquing what he could do in the future in order to contribute even more to those who need it most.

“For the most part I feel like I done gave back,” he says. “I feel like I could do more though. Like, giving back is good but I feel like I gotta show-- lead by example.” He continues, “I just want to give back because I feel like I can, and I’m fortunate enough to do it. I feel like we in times where people are making no money [but] it ain’t [just] about money so, that’s why you go give meals. Like, I did a giveback in Atlanta on the Southside-- it was like real deal like meals like not no hot plates, like, real stuff you can fill up your house with and people can eat for a few days, you know what I’m saying, they expect like real deal meals so I feel like that was like, showing more initiative and, I could be there next time, I can start showing my face. I always done gave back but like, just doing more and standing on tour people can see me do it like, my fans actually see me doing it, you know what I’m saying.”

Gunna’s recent fascination with astrology has been a core theme during this chapter of his rise. In learning more about himself as a Gemini, he’s evidently found sides of himself that he wants to explore more -- including the Wunna side.

While he plays it off as though the process was unconscious, Gunna’s alter-ego Wunna has been itching to make his grand entrance for a minute. Everything prior to WUNNA has been Drip Season, Drip Or Drown, Drip This, Drip That. Drip is something that has followed -- and will continue to follow -- Gunna forever. Wunna, on the other hand, dives deeper into what initially made drip so critical to him, exploring themes that he had previously touched on with more depth, like the neverending hustle to overcome obstacles in his way.

The majority of WUNNA was crafted while on a trip to Jamaica, and at the time, it was not even certain that they would walk away with a completed body of work. This level of spontaneity and freedom seems to have allowed the spirit of Wunna to emerge, with the 27-year-old finding versatility in himself, something beyond “drip.”

“I feel like [Wunna] probably comes out in exotic times,” says Gunna about his other persona. “I feel like Wunna would be a little more spontaneous [than Gunna is.] He’s a little more funny and amusing. I feel like that’s the type of energy I like to bring when I’m more on Wunna time.” He continues to provide context for Wunna: “Wunna, he ain’t really too tough, [he] not tryna go to no shows like that, Wunna, he’ll meet you at a party,” Gunna says, laughing.

Gunna allows a smile to peek through as he describes Wunna. He lights up reminiscing about the moment he discovered Wunna -- this other side of him -- uncontrollably tossing his braids, grinning. “Had to let my hair down, man,” he says, reflecting Wunna’s light-hearted nature.

This informal approach to music-making in Jamaica resulted in a #1 debut on the charts. Deservedly so, Gunna celebrated the moment, but he is keenly aware that the perfect strategy can also fuel a #1 album. Bundling and stream-trolling-- the act of loading an album with an abundance of songs, usually around twenty or thirty-- have become trendy methods to strategize a successful album.

“If you strategize right and make the right moves and you learn the game, then you can get a number one album,” asserts Gunna. Hit albums have, and will continue to be, carefully constructed by artists across the globe. One thing that is impossible to curate, though, is an emotional connection to the music. “But at the same time, you can have a number one album but it don’t stick, like your music don’t sit with people. I feel like my album sticks,” he continues.

“I feel like everything happened organically out there because it wasn’t planned, you know what I’m saying? It wasn’t scheduled out, it was just like, ‘let’s go to Jamaica, let’s just kick it,’ not ‘let’s make an album in Jamaica.’ Like, we gon’ have the studio, we gon’ work, but I didn’t even know what I was calling my album.”

This sort of spontaneous, tranquil approach to the album-creation process, and the discovery of Wunna, facilitated the conception of a song like “Far,” which closes out WUNNA. Even though Gunna had previously provided the framework for certain motivational soundbites earlier in his career, like on “Outta Sight Outta Mind” and “Pedestrian,” the fact that he was not holding himself to any particular album outcome surely played a part in “Far” becoming one his most honest, heartfelt, and impactful records ever.

Reflecting on all of the hardships he faced on the road to becoming a respected artist worldwide, including the death of his brother, losing friends to the system, and more, Gunna authentically delivers his life story to this point on “Far.” He teeters between past and present, which allows him to paint the entire picture.

“Thinkin’ how they put my brother in the ground, had to pour up more red,” raps Gunna, recalling his older brother’s passing in 2006. He circles back to his current lifestyle, flying women around the world and hustling to assure his future kids can have as lavish an experience as he can provide. The result of his oscillation from past to present, also touching on the future, supports a full account of where Gunna has been and where he’s headed.

Unconsciously, he may have been inspired by one of his favorite records ever: Jay-Z’s “Song Cry.”

“I feel like it’s a wholesome song for you to cry to, you know what I’m saying,” he says about Hov’s Grammy-nominated record. “It’s supposed to be happy tears though even though it’s about a sad situation, it’s still supposed to be like ‘you gon’ get through it’ though, it gives that type of vibe.” If you didn’t know he was talking about “Song Cry,” you may have assumed this description was referring to “Far,” showcasing their broad-stroke similarities.

Gunna may not be as adept a songwriter as Jay-Z but he manages to communicate that, despite all the hardships that may arise on the path to greatness, the smoke will eventually clear. “I feel like that was just one of the ones [where I’m] speaking all facts and real-life and how I felt about my situation and where I was born,” says Gunna.

On paper, “Song Cry” and “Far” are two completely different records. They don’t share a sound or any production elements. However, they both invite the listener to reflect on their own battles-- be it a failed relationship in Jay-Z’s case or the death of a loved one in Gunna’s.

As Gunna continues to explore Wunna, bettering himself and tapping into his own stories of loss and struggle, he will inevitably uncover new sides to his creativity. During quarantine, he has had the chance to truly embody his alter-ego. “Right now, it’s Wunna,” he says. “It’s no shows, it’s just spending and having fun right now. I’m used to having a schedule every week,” he adds, referring to his pre-COVID life. “You gon’ leave out of town this day, you gon’ be gone for this many days, and then you gon’ be back home. It ain’t been none of that. Shit, you wanna go here? Let’s go here. You wanna go here too? Let’s take a jet here, fuck it, it’s boredom.”

With plenty of spontaneity and spur-of-the-moment adventures on the agenda, Wunna is just the beginning.

0/1000CLOSE
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Who Is Wunna?

Words by: Alex Zidel
Photos by: Spike Jordan
& Maxime Quoilin

“I ain’t regular no more,” says Gunna matter-of-factly through a sneer. He’s slightly stunned that I asked when he finds time to merely be normal.

His response recalls that of his 2018 banger “Pedestrian.” “I can’t be a regular pedestrian,” raps Gunna on Drip Season 3. At that point in his career, it remained a high-minded goal of his to roam the streets and be recognized from all angles. It was more of a wish than a reality, but he confidently looked towards his future when he spit, “Can’t nobody stop me from my blessings.” Two short years later, he’s truly living his words, experiencing those blessings in real-time.

Today, he’s rocking an understated look, complete with a white deep V-neck t-shirt, and a pair of Off-White shorts. He’s fidgeting as our call begins, placing a series of bedazzled tennis chains around his neck, purposefully going one-by-one until he’s sufficiently pleased with his drip.

Sergio Kitchens has more or less retired his birth name. Unless he is with his immediate family -- his mother and brother specifically -- he goes by his self-appointed monikers, paired together by a childhood-reminiscent rhyme of “Gunna/Wunna.”

“They call me Serg,” Gunna says of his family. “My mom might call me Gunna just [from] time to time playing, laughing, but the majority of my family just calls me Serg.”

Gunna’s family has always supported his rap dreams, albeit, in a pragmatic way: “[My mom] never said don’t rap, she always said just have a backup plan.” This dose of realism was reflected in the way he was raised, too. Whereas some parents opt to shelter their children from worldly, or even local, issues, Gunna’s family valued transparency. “My family was just real about a lot of stuff, it wasn’t no lies being told. Well not even lies just like, facades. It wasn’t no picture painted, it was what it was, and my parents were just straightforward about a lot of things.” The lack of sugar-coating surely motivated the artist to not get bogged down by negativity, inspiring his roll-with-the-punches attitude.

Raised by a single mother, Gunna was the youngest of five boys. He learned as a youth that nothing would be handed to him, which instilled a mindset that he would need to brush away pain quickly, almost adopting an emotional numbness that would transform into his signature lackadaisical flow.

“If you outta sight, you outta mind/You gotta stack, you gotta grind,” raps Gunna on the opening track to the original Drip Season, “Outta Sight Outta Mind.” This sort of low-key motivational anthem has anchored his rise to the top, while reflecting his dismissive attitude towards anything negative.

These days, Gunna is a rockstar. He doesn’t get much sleep. Averaging anywhere between three-to-four hours of shut-eye per evening, the GRAMMY-nominated recording artist is often cranking out hits in the studio well past twilight, slipping into bed any time between 7 and 10 in the morning.

Gunna inevitably locks himself in the studio for a good portion of the day. He’s been recording tons of still-unreleased features these days, although the majority of the time, it sounds like he’s working with Young Thug and 21 Savage specifically. And even when he’s done at the studio, he’s not actually done-- “If I leave the studio and don’t go to the house, I’m probably going to another studio go fuck with [another rapper]-- yesterday I went and locked in with Nav for a few hours, but I left from here. I was up here with Thug and Savage, but I left and went over there to another studio just to catch another vibe, change the scenery and shit. I left there, came back here. Studio’s like a hangout spot to me,” Gunna reveals, laughing off his studio rat habits.

His drip -- getting dressed to the nines in designer garments and glowing jewelry -- is possibly his only other regularly-scheduled programming, even during quarantine. Gunna does not have much else in the way of a daily routine. “When I get up, I usually just go to the bathroom, wash my face, brush my teeth, and then I might go downstairs and smoke. I think that might be my normal morning. Face [wash], brush my teeth, get a blunt, and then start thinking about what I’m gonna do today.”

This go-with-the-flow attitude is emblematic of how Gunna operates as a human. He’s cool, collected, easygoing, and laid back.

“I just think I’m a calm person and I be nonchalant about a lot of shit. Not that I don’t care, but I just feel like the more energy you give something that’s negative, [the more] we stay on that topic,” he explains in a moment of profundity. “If you don’t give it that much energy, shit just gon’ go away. Time heals all. That’s how I be calm and relaxed, smoke that blunt, relax, sit back and I don’t try to think about it too much.” He pauses in a moment of concession, adding, “Everybody can’t do that.”

What if the blunt doesn’t work? “I did start working out too, when I was running out of things to do that felt like a stress reliever.”

Clearly, Gunna knows he can do more.

He’s very aware of the things he should be doing to maintain his sanity, a clear mind, and his booming career. Yoga, meditation, and other means of mindfulness are things that he has considered but, ultimately, he is reluctant to take the time to fully devote himself to the practice.

In other areas, though, like the ones that directly affect his career-- his musical output, his ability to perform-- he’s already begun the journey of self-betterment.

Placing another diamond-encrusted silver chain around his neck, Gunna compares his career trajectory to that of a Black-owned businessperson. Referring to himself as the product being marketed, he is cognizant of the fact that he must remain in tip-top shape to enjoy the pleasures of tomorrow.

"I just feel like the more energy you give something that’s negative, [the more] we stay on that topic."

Working out and eating healthy are recent additions to Gunna’s repertoire but he is already feeling the effects of his new habits, looking ahead to a possible joint headline tour with Lil Baby once coronavirus is in the past.

“I just wanted to feel different. I just wanted to feel like I worked more and did more than what I did last album,” admits Gunna of his healthy habits, slightly downplaying the significance of this statement with his passive tone. “It was about like my image, like, I’m looking at it and thinking shit finna open up, you know what I’m saying, so I wanna just be in shape for shows, fans, tours. I’m just thinking ahead.”

His self-improvement doesn’t stop with a fitness glo-up, though. Gunna has also been learning how to play the guitar, testing new vibes and constantly evolving as a creative. “It was just me, thinking for the future,” he says of his desire to learn the guitar, crossing his arms and shrugging.

As Gunna looks towards the future and his future-self, he pinpoints other areas that could be improved upon yet.

It appears Gunna’s soft-spoken nature has been quietly eating at him for the last couple of years. He watches other Geminis, naming Kanye West and Donald Trump specifically, getting their ideas out and proving what zodiac researchers have claimed for years. Geminis are expressive and, oftentimes, explosive. Gunna’s lyrical rhetoric is braggadocious but, in real life, he wants to rid himself of his mouselike placidity.

“It’s a lot of Geminis that’s really talented, like, we got the gift of gab. I feel like I can speak, but I just don’t do it a lot. I feel like, god damn one of these days and ages and times, I’m gonna just start being more outspoken about everything that I really think about, but I ain’t gon’ do it if I don’t feel comfortable. You know, like, god damn Kanye, he’s like a spokesperson. He’ll say some shit at the right time at the right moment. Pac was like that. Tupac. Even that n***a Trump, like, he always got something to say. Even if you not saying everything right, like, you know what I’m saying, but you got a voice.”

Elsewhere during our conversation, Gunna reflects on his philanthropic work and, again, assesses that he could be doing more. While speaking about a charity event that he organized in Atlanta, Gunna falls into another moment of vulnerability, critiquing what he could do in the future in order to contribute even more to those who need it most.

“For the most part I feel like I done gave back,” he says. “I feel like I could do more though. Like, giving back is good but I feel like I gotta show-- lead by example.” He continues, “I just want to give back because I feel like I can, and I’m fortunate enough to do it. I feel like we in times where people are making no money [but] it ain’t [just] about money so, that’s why you go give meals. Like, I did a giveback in Atlanta on the Southside-- it was like real deal like meals like not no hot plates, like, real stuff you can fill up your house with and people can eat for a few days, you know what I’m saying, they expect like real deal meals so I feel like that was like, showing more initiative and, I could be there next time, I can start showing my face. I always done gave back but like, just doing more and standing on tour people can see me do it like, my fans actually see me doing it, you know what I’m saying.”

Gunna’s recent fascination with astrology has been a core theme during this chapter of his rise. In learning more about himself as a Gemini, he’s evidently found sides of himself that he wants to explore more -- including the Wunna side.

While he plays it off as though the process was unconscious, Gunna’s alter-ego Wunna has been itching to make his grand entrance for a minute. Everything prior to WUNNA has been Drip Season, Drip Or Drown, Drip This, Drip That. Drip is something that has followed -- and will continue to follow -- Gunna forever. Wunna, on the other hand, dives deeper into what initially made drip so critical to him, exploring themes that he had previously touched on with more depth, like the neverending hustle to overcome obstacles in his way.

The majority of WUNNA was crafted while on a trip to Jamaica, and at the time, it was not even certain that they would walk away with a completed body of work. This level of spontaneity and freedom seems to have allowed the spirit of Wunna to emerge, with the 27-year-old finding versatility in himself, something beyond “drip.”

“I feel like [Wunna] probably comes out in exotic times,” says Gunna about his other persona. “I feel like Wunna would be a little more spontaneous [than Gunna is.] He’s a little more funny and amusing. I feel like that’s the type of energy I like to bring when I’m more on Wunna time.” He continues to provide context for Wunna: “Wunna, he ain’t really too tough, [he] not tryna go to no shows like that, Wunna, he’ll meet you at a party,” Gunna says, laughing.

Gunna allows a smile to peek through as he describes Wunna. He lights up reminiscing about the moment he discovered Wunna -- this other side of him -- uncontrollably tossing his braids, grinning. “Had to let my hair down, man,” he says, reflecting Wunna’s light-hearted nature.

This informal approach to music-making in Jamaica resulted in a #1 debut on the charts. Deservedly so, Gunna celebrated the moment, but he is keenly aware that the perfect strategy can also fuel a #1 album. Bundling and stream-trolling-- the act of loading an album with an abundance of songs, usually around twenty or thirty-- have become trendy methods to strategize a successful album.

“If you strategize right and make the right moves and you learn the game, then you can get a number one album,” asserts Gunna. Hit albums have, and will continue to be, carefully constructed by artists across the globe. One thing that is impossible to curate, though, is an emotional connection to the music. “But at the same time, you can have a number one album but it don’t stick, like your music don’t sit with people. I feel like my album sticks,” he continues.

“I feel like everything happened organically out there because it wasn’t planned, you know what I’m saying? It wasn’t scheduled out, it was just like, ‘let’s go to Jamaica, let’s just kick it,’ not ‘let’s make an album in Jamaica.’ Like, we gon’ have the studio, we gon’ work, but I didn’t even know what I was calling my album.”

This sort of spontaneous, tranquil approach to the album-creation process, and the discovery of Wunna, facilitated the conception of a song like “Far,” which closes out WUNNA. Even though Gunna had previously provided the framework for certain motivational soundbites earlier in his career, like on “Outta Sight Outta Mind” and “Pedestrian,” the fact that he was not holding himself to any particular album outcome surely played a part in “Far” becoming one his most honest, heartfelt, and impactful records ever.

Reflecting on all of the hardships he faced on the road to becoming a respected artist worldwide, including the death of his brother, losing friends to the system, and more, Gunna authentically delivers his life story to this point on “Far.” He teeters between past and present, which allows him to paint the entire picture.

“Thinkin’ how they put my brother in the ground, had to pour up more red,” raps Gunna, recalling his older brother’s passing in 2006. He circles back to his current lifestyle, flying women around the world and hustling to assure his future kids can have as lavish an experience as he can provide. The result of his oscillation from past to present, also touching on the future, supports a full account of where Gunna has been and where he’s headed.

Unconsciously, he may have been inspired by one of his favorite records ever: Jay-Z’s “Song Cry.”

“I feel like it’s a wholesome song for you to cry to, you know what I’m saying,” he says about Hov’s Grammy-nominated record. “It’s supposed to be happy tears though even though it’s about a sad situation, it’s still supposed to be like ‘you gon’ get through it’ though, it gives that type of vibe.” If you didn’t know he was talking about “Song Cry,” you may have assumed this description was referring to “Far,” showcasing their broad-stroke similarities.

Gunna may not be as adept a songwriter as Jay-Z but he manages to communicate that, despite all the hardships that may arise on the path to greatness, the smoke will eventually clear. “I feel like that was just one of the ones [where I’m] speaking all facts and real-life and how I felt about my situation and where I was born,” says Gunna.

On paper, “Song Cry” and “Far” are two completely different records. They don’t share a sound or any production elements. However, they both invite the listener to reflect on their own battles-- be it a failed relationship in Jay-Z’s case or the death of a loved one in Gunna’s.

As Gunna continues to explore Wunna, bettering himself and tapping into his own stories of loss and struggle, he will inevitably uncover new sides to his creativity. During quarantine, he has had the chance to truly embody his alter-ego. “Right now, it’s Wunna,” he says. “It’s no shows, it’s just spending and having fun right now. I’m used to having a schedule every week,” he adds, referring to his pre-COVID life. “You gon’ leave out of town this day, you gon’ be gone for this many days, and then you gon’ be back home. It ain’t been none of that. Shit, you wanna go here? Let’s go here. You wanna go here too? Let’s take a jet here, fuck it, it’s boredom.”

With plenty of spontaneity and spur-of-the-moment adventures on the agenda, Wunna is just the beginning.

0/1000CLOSE
Bobby White

Good shit Alex, and the photos are dope, not much variety tho. all in all great article

c_hectic
c_hectic
Aug 16, 2020

💚💚🐍🙏🏽🙏🏽The best I’ve ever read thank you Wunna’s Gunna I wish to walk with you one day! And work with you🙏🏽

Snickers
Snickers
Jul 30, 2020

wtf is this page design? this is awful

jimjamd1st
jimjamd1st
Jul 30, 2020

YSL for life

GOAT
GOAT
Jul 29, 2020

My god y’all hype up some trash

The glorious truths

What I’m the MySpace is this??!!

6Shit
6Shit
Jul 28, 2020

Finally something good from zidel

Redneck Locs
Redneck Locs
Jul 28, 2020

Babby had a coupme babys and thugger went after you lady like a frontline gunna

FredroStar
FredroStar
Jul 26, 2020

We got new Joey badass, Cole, logic, and a few other gems like jid and simino this week. But this is the headline. This is why hip hop is shit. Lyrics don't get the headlines anymore.

jimjamd1st

Apart from Cole... The rest you named are so boring

Pnd durag goat PND is the best

This is amazing

Mr. Satan
Mr. Satan
Jul 25, 2020

Alex were you clean when you wrote this or did you take some percs? YSL4LIFE

Weeknd GLAM
Weeknd GLAM
Jul 24, 2020

❗❗🔥🔥

metro boomin' want s'mores nigga

The cover stories are always the best thing about the site.

👾LORD PIŁŁS THE MIGHTY👾

Alex you’re 1-57 so far in articles for 2020. You’ll get there someday but good article

DirkDiggler
DirkDiggler
Jul 24, 2020

Gunna is the type of artist you listen to the song 5 times and then u realize he’s just saying dumb shit

whatsgucci
whatsgucci
Jul 24, 2020

Lmao did my nigga wrong with that first pic but this article dope tho

FINEST *nickelodeon* SLIME

Dope cover story. The photos and layout are looking clean af.

Rose Lilah
ADMIN
Rose Lilah
Jul 24, 2020

as always let us know what you guys think ☺️☺️☺️

Bobby White

Good shit Alex, and the photos are dope, not much variety tho. all in all great article

Alex Zidel
ADMIN
Alex Zidel
Jul 24, 2020

@Bobby White : appreciate you!

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