Many of her critics have blasted her for working with Tekashi 6ix9ine, on the grounds that he slept with a minor, who was then 13 years old. A Pitchfork contributor spoke on the subject in an article titled Nicki Minaj, 6ix9ine, and the Alarming Normalization of Predatory Behavior.

The article takes a position on the personal indictment of "creative types" after the camera stops rolling. The choice to frame everything politically makes total sense on the surface, but perplexing situations when a working definition is lacking of critical attention. Nicki's own brother is a convicted sex offender, so the subject hits rather close to home. Here's an excerpt from the article:

"The choice to use her platform to further legitimize a sexual predator is in direct contrast with the nation-wide, black women-led movement to silence music’s most infamous abuser (R. Kelly).

[…] If this pattern of normalization continues to seep into our culture, by the time the magnitude of the damage is determined it will have caused irreparable harm to society. […] I do hope she realizes that the message she sends by supporting an abuser threatens to eclipse the vibrant verses she has spent years perfecting."

Nicki shot back at the writer in a series of Tweets, first by pointing out certain discrepancies with a screenshot. Then she questioned how writers were even making money off "cultural criticism." Not once did she reference Tekashi or her sibling by name, but the implications are soundly present in her tone.




She capped off her Tweet-spree by singing the praises of her new album Queen, which she claims as the #1 album in over 86 countries. Nicki spent the rest of the afternoon interacting with well-wishing fans who supported her position.